Fastest way to recover from overtraining

Overtraining will significantly hinder your performance and frequently leads to serious injury. 

Here, your body cannot sufficiently manage or adjust to the high volume and intensity of exercise that you are performing. If you develop overtraining syndrome, you will need to take specific actions to speed up your recovery to prevent injury [1]. 

What is considered overtraining?

Overtraining happens when a person doesn’t adequately recuperate after continuous high-level training, including fatigue, possible injury and lower performance.

Depending on the span of symptoms and the severity of the case, overtraining is a serious condition that can take a long time to recover from. It doesn’t affect not only the muscular system but also the circulatory system, the nervous system, and the hormone regulation system. Recognising the warning signs earlier and being proactive in prevention will help you to avoid it.

Overtraining happens when a person doesn't adequately recuperate after continuous high-level training, including fatigue, possible injury and lower performance.

Signs and symptoms of overtraining

Identifying instances of overtraining may be difficult because it’s normal and expected to feel exhausted after gruelling training sessions. While feeling like you aren’t recovering between sessions or undergoing overall tiredness and complication, forcing yourself during workouts can signify overtraining.

These signs can be classified into the following [1]:

Training-related signs:

  • Delays in recovery from training
  • Leg muscles that feel “heavy”, even at lower exercise intensities
  • Incapacity to practise or compete at a previously manageable level
  • Performance plateaus or declines
  • Thoughts on missing or cutting short training sessions
  • Abnormal muscle soreness after a workout, which persists with ongoing training

Lifestyle-related signs:

  • Absence of energy, lowered motivation, moodiness
  • Increase in tension, depression, anger or confusion
  • Inability to relax
  • Prolonged general fatigue
  • Not feeling satisfaction from once-delightful things
  • Poor sleep quality

Health-related signs

  • Constipation or diarrhea
  • Increased occurrences of illness
  • High blood pressure and at-rest heart rate
  • Inconsistent menstrual cycles; missing periods
  • Weight and or appetite loss

It may be time to alter your training if you encounter any of these symptoms. Recognising these earlier and changing training to accommodate them would be fairer because the healing takes much longer if the signs become more intense and lengthy.


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How to recover fast from overtraining?

Don’t rush your return to training. It can take up to six months to two years to recover fully from overtraining syndrome [2], so cancel some competitions, training camps and adjust your schedule. And acknowledge that this could take some time.

Dr Mark Wotherspoon, a Consultant in Sport and Exercise Medicine and Southampton Football Club in the UK, recommends a multifaceted recovery to exercise and a package of support, coaching and therapy. According to him, sleeping is a huge part of recovery. In addition, rest as much as possible and don’t seek the magic trick that doesn’t exist.

How long does it take to heal from overtraining?

Resting is highly recommended and said to be the only way to recover from overtraining, which means you must discontinue training for some time. Depending on the sport and activity level, the period will range, but most recovery takes between four to twelve weeks. As you recover from overtraining, you can still do low-intensity aerobic exercise to keep fit and healthy while not doing regular workouts [3]. 

These should be short-interval activities not connected to the sport you usually train for. Once your symptoms have completely gone, you will be ready to ease back into a training schedule.

How do you prevent overtraining?‌

It’s necessary to take cues from your body. Keeping a training diary with your workouts and how you feel later can help you discover when to slow down. You shouldn’t try to exercise through pain just because you feel guilty about skipping a day.

Nutrition can have a crucial role in preventing overtraining as well. Ensure you observe a balanced diet with enough carbohydrates and protein to help power and repair your muscles. 

Your calorie intake should also be high enough to correspond with what you lose during training. Also, you should consume at least eight glasses of water daily to stay hydrated.

Keeping a training diary with your workouts and how you feel later can help you discover when to slow down

The connection between muscle recovery and age-related fatigue

Rest is paramount for muscle recovery. One issue you face as you get older is getting tired faster and slower healing.

However, whether you’re training professionally or for personal reasons, facilitating the process of muscle recovery through supplements is one way to support the body’s healing function. With this, you can still accomplish more of the physical activities you love.

What is mitochondrial or cellular energy?

The answer can be found in cells’ mitochondria, which are concerned with multiple cellular functions. Their most crucial process is bioenergetics – producing energy from utilising adenosine triphosphate (ATP). 

Mitochondria are key to energy production – the initial demonstration of how ATP functioned (back in 1997) earned it the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Mitochondria oxidise fats, proteins and sugars to produce chemical energy kept in ATP. 

The consequential ATP is energy which carries molecules that hauls the chemical energy from the breakdown of food to power other cellular processes – also known as the “energy currency of life”.

Healthspan, cellular energy and aging

Healthspan and lifespan have not kept pace with each other – and most people encounter a plunge in their health before they reach peak life expectancy. The longevity industry focuses on aging and ailments to increase healthspan and lifespan.

Mitochondrial dysfunction is looked at as a negative aging hallmark that reacts to the injury of aging. Clearly, mitochondrial dysfunction is linked to neurodegeneration, age-related illness and ischemic afflictions.

A more expected result of mitochondrial dysfunction is muscle strength loss, which many people begin to experience in their 40s due to an age-related decline in mitochondrial function and cellular bioenergetics [4].

Despite being vital to the process of energy production and cell function, the mitochondria’s role in aging and longevity is not fully understood. There are a few competing theories involving mitochondria dysfunction with aging.

Urolithin A with Mitopure from Amazentis

With this, scientists at Swiss company, Amazentis responsded to the challenge. A recent study indicates that exposing nematodes (roundworms) to urolithin A extends their lifespan and mitophagy [5]. 


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The worms’ mobility also got better with age and prolonged activity. Urolithin A also enhanced exercise ability in mice with age-related muscle deterioration.

Recent research shows that urolithin A can play a fundamental part in enhancing muscles and extending activity, which is highly significant as muscles decline with age, exposing us to the risks of frailty.

The ideal dosage for urolithin A

The Mitopure supplements hold 500mg of highly pure urolithin A, giving six times the amount of urolithin A available from diet alone. While the supplement is not meant to function by itself without regular exercise or fruit intake, it can be said that Mitopure is a practical and convenient way to elevate energy, mitochondrial health and muscular strength in older people.

Set an appointment with your doctor if you feel discomforts that don’t heal or worsen over time or if you constantly think your muscles are sore, especially if they last more than a day. Excessive training can be hazardous to your health, so try to listen to your body.

The information included in this article is for informational purposes only. The purpose of this webpage is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

‌[1] https://www.thephysicaltherapyadvisor.com/2015/03/23/10-tips-to-self-treat-overtraining-syndrome/
[2] https://runnersconnect.net/recovery-overtraining/
[3] https://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/a-z/water-aerobics
[4] https://rb.gy/8hiump
[5] https://www.nature.com/articles/nm.4132

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The information included in this article is for informational purposes only. The purpose of this webpage is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.