Garlic’s golden secret: Power-packed benefits of raw, empty stomach consumption

Do you know that raw garlic has incredible health properties when consumed on an empty stomach?

Reintroducing the garlic

The bulbous vegetable belongs to the Allium (onion) family and is widely used to flavor food. It is one of the most commonly used flavoring agents in the kitchen.

Despite its more potent, more intense flavor, raw garlic can be consumed safely and is an excellent addition to many dishes. Crushing and chopping fresh garlic releases allicin, which gives it its distinct flavor and smell [1]

Raw garlic consumption has the following benefits [2]:

Immunity

By boosting immunity, it protects the body from colds and coughs. Some research suggests that allicin could strengthen the immune system and defend against heart disease and cancer [1].

Gut health

It eases constipation and gastric discomfort. As far back as ancient Chinese and Indian medicine, garlic was supposed to help digestion and breathing [3].

Stamina

Garlic improves the performance of the liver and heart. In addition to being high in sulfur compounds, it helps activate liver enzymes responsible for flushing out toxins [3]. 

Brain health

Despite limited human research, animal studies have shown that consuming high amounts of fresh garlic or aged garlic extract could boost memory and promote brain health [456].

Some potential downsides to consider

Despite raw garlic’s numerous health benefits, there are a few potential drawbacks.

A significant disadvantage of raw garlic is its pungent taste and smell, which some people may not find appetizing. Furthermore, heartburn sufferers are often advised to limit their intake of garlic to prevent gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

Some compounds in raw garlic may irritate the digestive tract, resulting in chest or stomach pains [7]. A study on a garlic pill shows that it may also increase bleeding risk by preventing blood clots from forming [8].

Raw garlic should be avoided if you have severe acid reflux. Your doctor can help you determine whether giving up garlic is a good option if you do not want to.

You may be recommended to consume small amounts of garlic for a week and record any reactions you may experience. You can then determine if any foods trigger your symptoms.

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6271412/
[2] https://www.healthshots.com/healthy-eating/superfoods/5-health-benefits-of-eating-garlic-on-an-empty-stomach/
[3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4103721/
[4] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5295068/
[5] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4075686/
[6] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32010339/
[7] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6722787/
[8] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3915434/

The information included in this article is for informational purposes only. The purpose of this webpage is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.